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New research conducted by Survation for 4in10 reveals huge desire for new administrations to tackle poverty

Date Posted: 02 May 2018

For Immediate release

London Survey on Poverty and Wages.
Local Elections Poll
Sample size: 
1,005 Fieldwork dates: 27th - 30th April 2018
Methodology: People aged 18+ in London interviewed online
 
Survation. on behalf of 4in10

  • As with much of the country, London goes to the polls on Thursday, with Labour leading the Conservatives 51% to 31% the Lib Dems on 12%, others 6% in online fieldwork conducted by Survation 27th - 30th April
  • Parties should not take voters for granted however, with one in 10 voters telling Survation they are currently undecided on which party to vote for, 61% of Londoners say they would be more likely to vote for a party that made a commitment to improving the lives of the poorest children (Table 21)
  • 81% think local councils should pay all their staff the Real London Living Wage (Table 23)
  • Only one third of Londoners polled think their local council is doing everything possible to tackle child poverty (Table 18), with 65% wanting their new Council Leader to make a strong commitment on the issue (Table 19)
  • Those we polled are optimistic about what could be done: 75% say councils can take action to protect tenants from rogue landlords (Table 28)
  • Three quarters of Londoners also want their council to increase the availability of social housing (Table 27), while 85% would feel positively about their local council if they were to take measures to improve the quality of the private rented sector (Table 29)
  • 63% believe parents in part-time work can become trapped in low-paid positions by a lack of quality flexible jobs (Table 20), and 71% want their local authority to promote flexibility in work patterns (Table 11)

 
Full data tables and all questions can be found here:
 
Commenting on the findings, Laura Payne of 4in10 said:
 
“Families are struggling in London with a combination of high housing and childcare costs, low wages and cuts to welfare support. It seems this has not gone unnoticed by Londoners with 65% of those living inside Greater London for four years or more saying the level of poverty in London has increased. London local authorities face particular challenges to best support the families they serve. 
Money is very difficult to find for councils, but even more so for their low-income residents. 
 
London Child Poverty Alliance has come together to publish a manifesto for London’s Local Authorities, with twelve recommendations which could make things better for London’s families - we hope the new administrations pay heed to the public desire for action on poverty, wages and homes."
 
 
Notes to editors:

  1. 4in10 is London's Child Poverty Campaign Network of over 200 like-minded voluntary and community organizations, Local Authorities and individuals from across London; campaigning on key issues that affect the capital’s 700,000 children currently living in poverty. org.uk
  2. 4in10 is funded by Trust for London and City Bridge Trust and hosted by the charity, Children England.
  3. The manifesto Doing better for London's families is supported by a broad coalition of charities, working as part of the London Child Poverty Alliance (LCPA) and committed to tackling child poverty in London. 4in10 co-coordinates - London Child Poverty Alliance (LCPA) .
  4. For more info on the London Child Poverty Alliance, or 4in10 Contact laura.payne@childrenengland.org.uk t: 07929125589 / 0203 597 6292

 
About Survation 

  1. Survation conduct telephone, online and in-person market research, as well as strategy & advisory research for well-known brands & organisations.
  2. Survation are members of the British Polling Council.
  3. You can sign up other email addresses or colleagues to our press release list here
  4. Follow Survation on Twitter:  @Survation- Our Main Account
  5. More about the services Survation provide can be found 
  6. For press enquiries, please call 0203 818 9661 or email enquiry@survation.com

Survation Ltd Registered in England & Wales Number 07143509

Table 4. Current Voting Intention in the Local Election
(Base: Respondents likely to vote with undecided and refused removed)

 

CON

LAB

LD

Another party

VI Local Election

31%

51%

12%

6%

 
 
Table 5. Which of the following phrases describes your work pattern?
(Base: All respondents)
I have no say over the days and times I work every week: 22%
I have little say over the days and times I work every week: 20%
I have some say over the days and times I work every week: 22%
I have a great deal of say over the days and times I work every week: 37%
 
 
Tables 6-9. On a scale of 0 to 10, where 0 means "impacts negatively" and 10 means "impacts positively", to what extent do you think that more flexibility in your work pattern would impact the following?
(Base: All respondents)

 

0-3 (negative impact)

4-6

7-10 (positive impact)

Your pay

21%

37%

41%

The quality of your relationship with your children and/or family

14%

29%

57%

Your ability to progress in your career

21%

38%

41%

Your overall happiness and well-being

11%

26%

63%

 
 
Table 10. When thinking about the next year, do you expect your personal financial situation to improve, remain the same or worsen?
(Base: All respondents)
Improve: 44%
Remain the same: 39%
Worsen: 15%
Don’t know: 2%
 
Table 11. Would you support or oppose proposals from your local authority to promote flexible working for families on low incomes?
(Base: All respondents)
Support: 71%
Oppose: 6%
Don’t know: 23%
 
Table 12. Which of the following statements best describes your views with regards to the way people such as yourself perceive poverty in London?
(Base: All respondents)
I think people such as myself are greatly concerned about the level of poverty in London: 39%
I think people such as myself are somewhat concerned about the level of poverty in London: 47%
I think people such as myself are not at all concerned about the level of poverty in London: 7%
Don’t know: 7%
 
Table 13. In your opinion, since you have moved to London, would you say that the level of poverty in London - not just in the area in which you live - has…
(Base: Living inside Greater London for three years or less)

Increased

67%

Remained the same

24%

Decreased

7%

Don’t know

2%

 
 
Table 14. And with regards to your local area - the area under the authority of your Local Council - has the level of poverty increased or decreased since you have moved to London?
(Base: Living in London Borough for three years or less)

Increased

53%

Remained the same

31%

Decreased

7%

Don’t know

8%

 
 Table 15. In your opinion, in the last four years, would you say that the level of poverty in London - not just in the area in which you live - has…
 
(Base: Living inside Greater London for four years or more)

Increased

65%

Remained the same

22%

Decreased

5%

Don’t know

8%

 
 
Table 16. And with regards to your local area - the area under the authority of your Local Council - has the level of poverty increased or decreased since you have moved to London?
(Base: Living in London Borough for four years or more)

Increased

52%

Remained the same

30%

Decreased

6%

Don’t know

12%

 
 
Table 17. To what extent do you agree or disagree with the following statements?
 
“Tackling child poverty has been a high priority for my local council.”
(Base: All respondents)

Agree

36%

Neither agree nor disagree

30%

Disagree

18%

Don’t know

16%

 
Tables 18-20. To what extent do you agree or disagree with the following statements?
(Base: All respondents)

 

Agree

Neither agree nor disagree

Disagree

Don’t know

My Local Council is doing everything possible to tackle child poverty

33%

28%

21%

18%

It is important that, after the local election, my Council Leader makes a strong commitment to tackle child poverty

65%

21%

8%

5%

Parents in part-time work can sometimes struggle to improve their pay or progress in a career because London has a low supply of quality flexible jobs

63%

22%

7%

7%

 
 
Table 21. If a party made a commitment to improving the lives of the poorest children in London, would this make you more or less likely to vote for them, or would it not affect your vote?
(Base: All respondents)

More likely

61%

Would not affect my vote

36%

Less likely

3%

 
 
Table 22. To what extent do you think that poverty affects people who are working full-time in London?
(Base: All respondents)
A few people people who are working full-time in London: 28%
Some people who are working full-time in London: 49%
A lot of people who are working full-time in London: 23%
 
Table 23. The National Living Wage is the mandatory minimum rate the government requires employers pay workers over 25 in the UK, calculated from average earnings. It is currently set at £7.83 per hour.
 
The Real Living Wage is the rate employers voluntarily opt to pay workers, independently calculated annually based on the cost of living. It is currently set at £10.20 per hour in London.
 
People living in London face the highest living costs in the UK and, according to the 2017 London’s Poverty Profile report, the majority of people in poverty (58%) are living in a working family.
 
To what extent do you agree or disagree that your Local Council should pay the Real London Living Wage to all its staff?
(Base: All respondents)

Agree

81%

Neither agree nor disagree

13%

Disagree

4%

Don’t know

2%

 
 
Table 24. How often, if at all, do you worry about your financial situation?
(Base: All respondents)
Often: 26%
Sometimes: 46%
Rarely: 20%
Never: 8%
Don’t know: 1%
 
Table 25. Some local authorities set up credit unions to help families avoid short term financial difficulties and expensive high street loans.
Would you like to see your local authority promote low cost lending in this way?

(Base: All respondents)
Yes: 62%
No: 15%
Don’t know: 23%
 
Table 26. Many local authorities in London use bailiffs to pursue residents who are in debt on their Council Tax.
Some local authorities choose never to use bailiffs against their residents as they believe this can push people further into debt and erode trust in the Council.

 
Do you think that your Council should use bailiffs on families with children if they are in debt?
(Base: All respondents)
Yes: 31%
No: 49%
Don’t know: 20%
 
Tables 27-28. The majority of children living in poverty in London are also in private rented housing, and many are living in temporary accommodation as a result of the housing crisis.
 
To what extent do you agree or disagree with the following statements?
(Base: All respondents)

 

Agree

Neither agree nor disagree

Disagree

Don’t know

My local council needs to increase the availability of social housing in my borough so families in poverty have somewhere affordable to live

75%

16%

5%

4%

My local council can take action to protect tenants from rogue landlords

75%

16%

4%

5%

 
Table 29. Which of the following is closest to your opinion?
(Base: All respondents)
I would feel more positively about my local council if they took measures to improve conditions in the private rented sector,
such as requiring potential landlords to apply for a landlord licence: 85%

I would not feel more positively about my local council if they took measures to improve conditions in the private rented sector,
such as requiring potential landlords to apply for a landlord licence: 15%
 
Table 30. Would you support or oppose proposals from your local council to increase the availability of social housing in your borough so families in poverty have somewhere affordable to live?
(Base: All respondents)
Support: 75%
Oppose: 9%
Don’t know: 16%

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